Author Topic: utilities when letting  (Read 1200 times)

Offline rosiehill

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utilities when letting
« on: May 25, 2018, 19:54:55 pm »
hi I want to rent out an apartment in the costa de antigua area and the agent tells me normal practice is for me to pay first 50 eur of tenant's monthly utils.

Never heard of this before and seems bit of hassle in terms of admin etc. Anyone any thoughts on it?

Offline Logitechtom

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2018, 00:29:44 am »
From looking for at adverts for rental properties, it looks pretty standard practice. Most rental properties include the first 50 or 60 euro for utilities - anything above that the tenant pays.

Tom.

Offline chollis

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2018, 03:27:19 am »
This is fairly standard practice for agents, but not necessarily for private landlords renting out themselves. Normal for landlords to pay the council taxes and community charge and tenants to pay the water and electric. You can put the utilities in the tenants name, but our preference as as landlords is to have an advance monthly payment on top of the rent each month, us pay the bills, and then adjust this against the actual bills of which our tenants are welcome to copies. Hope that helps.

Offline yamxj

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2018, 16:17:15 pm »
i sent you PM rosie

Offline Lexeus

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2018, 13:07:09 pm »
I have experienced both systems. It has traditionally been fairly common for the landlord to include say €50/month for services in the rental price, and the rental contract will state that you are liable for any water/electricity charges that cost more than €50/month. I think perhaps historically there was a risk of the property building up services debt from a bad tenant, but nowadays I am told water/electricity bills are in the name of a person rather than the property it self, but even now my landlord has the bills in their name and I just pay the stated invoice.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2018, 13:09:21 pm by Lexeus »

Offline erik_tonny

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2018, 14:30:49 pm »
I have experienced both systems. It has traditionally been fairly common for the landlord to include say €50/month for services in the rental price, and the rental contract will state that you are liable for any water/electricity charges that cost more than €50/month. I think perhaps historically there was a risk of the property building up services debt from a bad tenant, but nowadays I am told water/electricity bills are in the name of a person rather than the property it self, but even now my landlord has the bills in their name and I just pay the stated invoice.
If the landlord pays the bills (which means that you can not pay them) he can have water and electricity cut off if the tenant doesn't pay the rent.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2018, 17:02:52 pm by erik_tonny »

Offline chollis

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2018, 14:37:36 pm »
If the landlord pays the bills (which means that you can not pay them) he can have water and electricity cut off if the tenant doesn't pay the rent.
[/quote]

If the bills are in the landlords name it is unlawful for the landlord to not pay the bills even if the renter has not paid the rent. If a landlord does this the tenant can denounce the landlord who will be fined by the courts. Tenants rights are quite extensive under Spanish laws.

Offline erik_tonny

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2018, 15:37:22 pm »
If the landlord pays the bills (which means that you can not pay them) he can have water and electricity cut off if the tenant doesn't pay the rent.

If the bills are in the landlords name it is unlawful for the landlord to not pay the bills even if the renter has not paid the rent. If a landlord does this the tenant can denounce the landlord who will be fined by the courts. Tenants rights are quite extensive under Spanish laws.

Great, now lets be practical:
Think the tenant is going to wait for months in a home without water and electricity while the case is waiting in some court?
I was just explaining how some landlords think.
In the mean time the landlord is also taking the tenant to court for not paying the rent.  :D

Offline chollis

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2018, 02:50:49 am »
If the landlord pays the bills (which means that you can not pay them) he can have water and electricity cut off if the tenant doesn't pay the rent.

If the bills are in the landlords name it is unlawful for the landlord to not pay the bills even if the renter has not paid the rent. If a landlord does this the tenant can denounce the landlord who will be fined by the courts. Tenants rights are quite extensive under Spanish laws.

Great, now lets be practical:
Think the tenant is going to wait for months in a home without water and electricity while the case is waiting in some court?
Great, now lets be practical:
Think the tenant is going to wait for months in a home without water and electricity while the case is waiting in some court?
I was just explaining how some landlords think.
In the mean time the landlord is also taking the tenant to court for not paying the rent.  :D

Non payment of rent would involve a private action by the landlord to take the tenant to court. However, unlawful actions by the landlord such as not paying the utility bills. wrongful eviction, entering the premises without permission, changing the locks to prohibit the tenant entry are all actions for which the landlord can be denounced for to the Police. As such they end up in the courts in a matter of days. Wrongful eviction through entering the premises and changing the locks can carry up to a 6 month prison sentence. You may find this an interesting read.
https://www.spanishpropertyinsight.com/legal/tenant-eviction-spain/

« Last Edit: June 09, 2018, 12:49:15 pm by chollis »

Offline spitfire58

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2018, 09:54:27 am »
I have no intention of renting out our place but all this would definitely put me off if it was a possibility !!

Offline Lexeus

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Re: utilities when letting
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2018, 19:43:20 pm »
Chollis, real law abiding people that have jobs don't behave in that way though. Those 'rights' are usually only abused by squaters and wasters that don't want to pay their rent.

I know a guy here who after over a year of renting a house, had the landlord go in without permission and start turning his rented house's garage into another flat for another family. You can imagine the noise and dust, but he also dumped all their possession that were in the garage in their kitchen, all done on one afternoon whilst they were out. If that doesn't sound bad enough, the guy had a 6 week old baby. Anyway, let's just say he didn't both to take the landlord to court and  he was out in 3 weeks.